Dada Poetry Review

You’ll recall the challenge I issued to create your own version of a Tristan Tzara dada cut-up poem?

Read the original post here: https://trashbubblesandlifeslittlebits.wordpress.com/2016/02/12/dadaism-celebrating-100-years/

Read the follow-up post here: https://trashbubblesandlifeslittlebits.wordpress.com/2016/03/19/a-look-at-dada-poetry/

Terry Owenby, of Portland, Oregon, bravely stepped outside her comfort zone to accept the challenge and this is what transpired…

Terry Owneby Dada Cut Up 2016

In the meantime, I completed two of my dada poems using the words played in Scrabble games and am sending them out to Terry Owenby and Keith Chambers, in thanks. Here’s one to whet your appetite:

Scrabble Dada Poem created within the confines of one game's word list.

Scrabble Dada Poem created within the confines of one game’s word list

Discovering new and unusual art is always a delight for me. This week, I found some great work being created by Ray Craig. I stumbled upon his “poem(s) set in stencils” and was immediately taken with them. I think you will be, too.

nurse ghost daughter bus by Ray Craig

nurse ghost daughter bus by Ray Craig

egg nurse by Ray Craig

egg nurse by Ray Craig

ghost egg sits at 8 by Ray Craig

ghost egg sits at 8 by Ray Craig

sits at by Ray Craig

sits at by Ray Craig

at too bus at 8 by Ray Craig

at too bus at 8 by Ray Craig

Hope you enjoyed this Dada poetry review.

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

 

 

 

 

 

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4 thoughts on “Dada Poetry Review

  1. I really like your Scrabble poem and also Ray Craig’s stencil poems. I may have to try the stencil idea, as I do enjoy working with stencils. Thank you for sharing my cut-up poem. Cut-up poetry is more difficult than I imagined it would be. I had difficulty letting go of (and not correcting) the sentence left hanging at the end. I have a hard time reading the poem, only to come upon that crazy-making ending.

    • Thanks, Terry. Yours was wonderful! A lovely first try, for sure! Dada never makes perfect sense, especially the method you used. The most one can hope for is a semblance of silliness in which one can see some bizarre meaning of sorts. Read the first four lines of my Scrabble Dada aloud and hear the cadence and see what I mean. Another way to do this is to randomly open the dictionary and pick words, one from each randomly opened page, and make a list. Use those words and see what happens. You can jot them on an index card, you don’t have to get fancy with the letter stickers like I did. Simplicity is actually desirable in dada. Always remember, crazy = dada. ๐Ÿ˜€

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