My Wild and Crazy World: Getting Ready for Black Mountain School

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Happy Saturday Morning!

I’m popping in with an announcement… This past week got crazy, what with all of the preparations for my upcoming trip to BMS (Black Mountain School.) I don’t anticipate the coming week will be any better, as I leave this coming Friday.

That said, Friday Dada posts are on hold until further notice. The next several weeks’ Monday Morning Mail Art Call (MMMAC) posts have been scheduled, so there’s no interruption there. I will do my best to resume the Tuesday Trash Bubble posts after having skipped this week, hoping to build Trash Bubbles at BMS and share them with you all.

In addition, I will be posting from BMS about all manner of things, including my experiences as I go. I will also be posting shorter blurbs and pictures on my facebook artist page: https://www.facebook.com/TheStudioatPineyCreekAcres/ If you are friends with me on facebook, there will be status updates, too.

Just this week, I launched my Patreon artist page and will also be posting about BMS there. https://www.patreon.com/TheStudioatPineyCreekAcres?ty=h I will share more about my Patreon at a later date.

Each of these venues will receive different posts, so you might want to check ’em all so as not to miss any of the BMS excitement!

Finally, a BIG THANK YOU!!! to everyone who helped to make this trip to BMS a reality for me! To those of you who shared my Go Fund Me, ( https://www.gofundme.com/pmy4c6fc ) contributed to it, and those who offered words of encouragement and support… I truly could not have done it without you. You are ROCK STARS to me! Thank you all, from the bottom of my heart, for believing in me!

 

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Friday Dada: How do you know?

Short of someone placing the word DADA somewhere in their work, how do you know it is a dadaist piece?

Today, I will go over some over the key characteristics of Dada.

  • DADA loves a pun! The punnier, the better. Whether a visual pun or a verbal one, it matters not, so long as it is punny. A prime example of this turned up this past week in a featured piece from Catherine Mehrl Bennett in my Tuesday Trash Bubbles Post. On the back of her bubble was this little gem :

MAKE ART NOT CENTS

Here is an excerpt of what Catherine responded to one reader who misunderstood the intention of the artistamp: “The statement, “Make Art/ Not Cents” is more ambiguous than it appears at first glance. Also you need to look at it in the context of mailart, for which this stamp is intended for use. The poetic intent is the phonetic sound of Cents = Sense, and is a Dada statement in that regard. The “mailart” intent involves two levels: One is the context of artistamp design based on official postage which always has a specific VALUE element, and this artistamp is thus given NO value. Two is the context of mailart, which has an unspoken rule of NOT being intended for sale in the official art market.”

  • At it’s core, DADA is nonsensical. The original poets and artists of the new Dada age were trying to escape the real world. Their world had been rocked by war and fascism. They were attempting to create a lighter, more creative atmosphere, one that embraced rather than destroyed. And yet, Dada was negative and destructive in nature. It took things like words, tore them apart and reassembled them. Surely, you recall our previous talks about Tristan Tzara and his cut-up poems. Tristan Tzara, the Romanian poet was the driving force behind literary DADA and editor of the periodical, DADA beginning in 1917 with its first issue. Below are pictures of the covers for the first three issues.

Visual Dada was much the same as literary Dada insofar as nonsense and cutups. Early on, one of the leading visual Dada artists was Marcel Duchamp whose work was indicative of the tearing down of a thing only to reassemble it in another manner. (Remember his cubist-style paintings?) He freely admits that he passed through several movements of art before finding his niche. You really need to watch the following BBC interview of Duchamp from 1968.

See and hear for yourself why Marcel stayed on the fringe… and don’t forget to notice the Ready Made sitting to his left in the film! Yep, it’s his Egouttoir, or Bottle Dryer. I’m not certain if it’s the original from 1914 or a later version, of which there were several.

If you want to check out the Great Glass (Large Glass) that they discuss, this is the best link I’ve found: http://www.philamuseum.org/collections/permanent/54149.html#

  • Cést la vie! This french phrase means such is life, generally speaking. Here in the US, it translates loosely to Shit Happens. Pure Dadaists embraced Chance. By that, I mean that they accepted that things happen and if a thing happened to their art, or during their performance piece, it was meant to happen and it was embraced as part of a thing. This happens all the time in mail art. The postal cancellation, the elements, a footprint, a broken machine that burns marks upon the surface of mail. I hear so many folks say, “I’m so sorry the postal service allowed that to happen to this…” great thing you sent, or received. Few understand the organic concept of embracing the marks as part of the piece.

Well, boys and girls, that’s my DADA talk for today. Go, watch, read and learn! Come back and tell me something cool!

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

 

Dada Poetry Review

You’ll recall the challenge I issued to create your own version of a Tristan Tzara dada cut-up poem?

Read the original post here: https://trashbubblesandlifeslittlebits.wordpress.com/2016/02/12/dadaism-celebrating-100-years/

Read the follow-up post here: https://trashbubblesandlifeslittlebits.wordpress.com/2016/03/19/a-look-at-dada-poetry/

Terry Owenby, of Portland, Oregon, bravely stepped outside her comfort zone to accept the challenge and this is what transpired…

Terry Owneby Dada Cut Up 2016

In the meantime, I completed two of my dada poems using the words played in Scrabble games and am sending them out to Terry Owenby and Keith Chambers, in thanks. Here’s one to whet your appetite:

Scrabble Dada Poem created within the confines of one game's word list.

Scrabble Dada Poem created within the confines of one game’s word list

Discovering new and unusual art is always a delight for me. This week, I found some great work being created by Ray Craig. I stumbled upon his “poem(s) set in stencils” and was immediately taken with them. I think you will be, too.

nurse ghost daughter bus by Ray Craig

nurse ghost daughter bus by Ray Craig

egg nurse by Ray Craig

egg nurse by Ray Craig

ghost egg sits at 8 by Ray Craig

ghost egg sits at 8 by Ray Craig

sits at by Ray Craig

sits at by Ray Craig

at too bus at 8 by Ray Craig

at too bus at 8 by Ray Craig

Hope you enjoyed this Dada poetry review.

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

 

 

 

 

 

A Look at Dada Poetry

Fridays have not been good for Dada. We are lucky to get this brief post up on Saturday, folks. Things have been busy, busy, busy at Piney Creek Acres this week.

A few weeks back, I issued a challenge to folks to try their hand at creating a Dada poem based a Tristan Tzara technique. I provided this link to MoMA’s Make Poetry with Chance instructions: http://www.moma.org/learn/moma_learning/themes/dada/word-play

Since then, I have located a few other links:

A good Tristan Tzara bio: http://www.poemhunter.com/tristan-tzara/biography/

And a few of Tristan’s poems: http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/the-great-lament-of-my-obscurity-three/ AND http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/proclamation-without-pretension/ AND http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/vegetable-swallow/

Do consider trying your hand at a Dadaist poem. The newspaper cut-up suggestion by MoMA is merely one way of achieving the desired effect. I am currently working on one using only the words from a Scrabble game with a friend. Below, you’ll find a piece of redacted Dadaist poetry sent to me by Keith Chambers.

KeithChambersDADApoetry

Keith Chambers Redacted Dada Poem

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

 

Dada Celebrations

Time got away from me… it’s already Saturday. So much for Friday Dada posts, huh? LoL! I figured that you wouldn’t hold it against me if you knew that I’d spent all of Friday with the cutest guy in the world…

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This week, we’re taking a look at Dada 100th anniversary celebrations far and wide.

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In Minneapolis, Minnesota, the Minne Dada will take place August 11th thru the 14th. I found this post via Michael Jacobson on facebook. He says this will be, “A Summer Festival, and celebration of 100 years of Dada, here in Minneapolis! Film, poetry, noise, etc. More info coming soon. This party is organized by Tom Cassidy AKA Musicmaster. Here is Tom’s email for more info: tom.cassidy@mmha.com” I sincerely hope that those of you in the Minneapolis area will consider taking part.

Via Jackie Haynes on facebook, I learned of this event in Milan, Italy…

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She says, “Italian Dada action via our correspondent in Zurich www.dadamt.ch

In Dortmund, Germany, folks are gearing up for the Dadado100.

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Taken from the Dada 100 blog, the following is a link to a comprehensive list of current and upcoming Dada exhibitions celebrating 100 years of Dada… https://dada100dotorg1.wordpress.com/dada-events/

As you might expect, more than a few pieces of Dada art have been coming my way for publication here on Dada Fridays. Below, you will find one of them, followed by a throwback Dada piece. Both pieces are mail art.

DadaCreep

Postcard from Linda French in response to Keith Chambers’ “Dada is self-aware” postcard.

MSSlaneDADAfront

MSSlaneDADAback

MSSlaneDADAinsidefront

MSSlaneDADAInsideopen

That’s it for this week. Next week, we’ll be taking a look at Dada poetry.

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

 

 

 

 

Dada: American Style

Linda French - postcard Dada and Fluxus are only somewhat

Postcard for Keith Chambers, by Linda French, 2016

Dada hit the New York scene in 1915 and largely, it stayed there for eight short years. Why leave? Why New York? Who were the New York Dadaists? What was their angle? What did they hope to accomplish?

Keith Chambers (Amalgamated Confusion) with Charlie Holt A

Keith Chambers (Amalgamated Confusion) with Charlie Holt (A)

This week, I challenge you to dig in, to read about Dada in New York. I could conceivably write a fresh piece from my perspective, but I feel that there are several good sources online that can acquaint you with the basics and guide you on to further information, should you be so curious. I present you with three such links to start you off.

Keith Chambers (Amalgamated Confusion) with Charlie Holt B

Keith Chambers (Amalgamated Confusion) with Charlie Holt (B)

Every search will turn up something from wikipedia, from the mundane to the obscure. I’m not its biggest fan, but it’s a place to get generalities, a good starting point, if you will.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_York_Dada

Dada Art has an extensive website devoted to Dada. I especially appreciate its page of Dada links, all which are quality references.

http://www.dadart.com/dadaism/dada/023-dada-newyork.html

If you want to learn anything about modern art whatsoever, MoMA, is definitely the way to go. Factual and yet, interesting.

http://www.moma.org/learn/moma_learning/themes/dada

Denise Woodward - Dada Dreams of Elvis Hair

ATC for Keith Chambers, by Denise Woodward – Dada Dreams of Elvis Hair 2016

In closing, I’d like to thank Keith Chambers for the use of his images, including the collaborations with Charlie Holt, and those sent to him in recent weeks. Thanks to Charlie Holt, Linda French and Denise Woodward also.

May you all take time to learn a little bit about the origins of Dada in New York and may you connect with your inner Dada.

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

Dada: The Celebration Continues 2-19

Last week we touched on what Dada is and I invited you to create your own Dadaist poetry and exchange it with me.

This week, I’d like to expand a little on Dada, sharing a bit about two key women in the Dadaist movement.

Before I do, I’d like to share a piece of Dada mail I received this week. Jude Weirmeir is a very active mail artist whose prolific work is a delight to behold. It is quirky, whimsical, musical and highly entertaining. The things I’ve received from San Diego, California in his name are some of the most treasured pieces in my archives. This one is no exception. It is a celebration of 100 years of Dada.

Jude Weirmeir Dada 100 Years (front)

Jude Weirmeir Dada 100 Years (front)

Jude Weirmeir Dada 100 Years (back)

Jude Weirmeir Dada 100 Years (back)

It must be said that I swooned over the Dada stamps on the back side of this envie. And they gave me the idea for this post.

One of Jude’s rubber stamps depicts “Emmy Hennings, 1st Dada Donor.” Emmy was the wife of Hugo Ball. She gave herself over to a life of Dada from the moment they met in 1913. She had been a published poet and performer with left-wing leanings, so this transition was a natural progression. She and Hugo were founding members of the Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich, Switzerland and she was known as the “shining star of the Voltaire.” I strongly encourage you to learn more about Emmy and her poetry and performance art, though I will say that not much of her work can be found independently of Hugo Ball. They were inseparable and their work was codependent.

Another of Jude’s rubber stamps shows the silhouette of Hannah Höch. She was the most prominent female member and contributor to the Dada movement in Berlin, Germany. Her humble beginnings in fashion and textile were short-lived and she is more widely known for her social, feminist commentary via photo montage and collage. She felt strongly her position of being on the outside, looking in, the only woman in a largely male group of Dadaists who exuded their gender superiority. The chauvinist group included Raoul Hausmann, Georg Schrimpf, Johannes Baader and Hans Richter. In response, a good deal of her work addressed this. Her collage style was more harmonious and cohesive than her male counterparts, another reason they discounted her work. Her art was offensive to the Nazi regime and was included under the “degenerative art” label. She led a very quiet and secluded existence during World War II and her art thereafter did not achieve the acclaim it had before the war. In January thru March of 2014, a comprehensive collection of her work was exhibited at The Whitechapel Gallery, London. I would have loved to have been present at that exhibit! It must be said that I consider Hannah to be the Mother of Modern Collage. One needs only to view images of her work to see how she paved the way for much of what we, as modern day collage artists, do. Once again, I urge you to learn more about Hannah and her work. There are lots of excellent links to be found online, as well as images of her work. Start with the link below. You’ll be glad you did.

http://www.moma.org/explore/multimedia/audios/29/704

If you’re at all like me, you’ll have developed an insatiable curiosity for the people and concepts that we have barely touched upon. Go forth, feed that curiosity and expand your knowledge of Dada and its central characters. Celebrate the accomplishments of those who have come before.

In the tradition of Hannah Höch, I challenge you to create a Dadaist collage with a central theme of great social or economic import to you. Look to the headlines of the day, if you need inspiration. You can share it via social media using the hashtags (#)Dadawatch and (#)MyDada. If you send it to me at The Studio at Piney Creek Acres as mail art, I will send one to you in kind.

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!