Tuesday Trash Bubbles:

Last week, I offered out the E6000 & Duct Tape Trash Bubble as a give-away. It didn’t go over as I had hoped, so I am back to my tried and true method of finding homes for my bubbles… intuitively making and sending.

Today, I offer up a different kind of Trash Bubble. This one is smallish in size and requires no mailing. It is meant as a gift tag, or package topper.

Back in 2013, when GreenCraft magazine published my article on Trash Bubbles! in its winter issue, I showcased several kinds, the gift tag/package topper being one of them. This was the example given in the magazine spread:

greencraftwinter2013-010

FLY is my current example of a Trash Bubble for use as a gift tag/package topper.

FLY (front)

Made from a Tim Holtz idealogy blister pack, I utilized the design on the insert as my background.

FLY (close-up brown bird 2) FLY (close-up orange bird) FLY (close-up blue bird)

The dome-like sections provided the perfect space for nesting birdies and the theme was born. Bits of string, thread and other fibers not useful for any other projects and normally considered trash, were used to construct the “nests.” The birds went into the domes first, followed by the bits. It was tricky to strike the correct balance of bits to support the tiny birds without burying them, or knocking them off-kilter within the domes.

FLY (washi close-up)

Needing to cover up the printed information on the package insert while leaving the design exposed, I used washi tapes that supported my theme. Rubber stamp letters were then used to stamp the title on the piece before I sealed it up.

FLY (back)

The back was painted with black gesso and finished with black washi tape. I am unsatisfied with the insecure closure, so I will eventually go back and strengthen it before using it.

That’s it for today. I hope you’ll consider creating this type of bubble for your next wrapping job. Please share if you do.

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

 

 

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A Piece of the Puzzle

In an attempt to find my way back, I’d begun the month of January cleaning, sorting and organizing my studio. I didn’t get very far.

One item kept tripping me up — literally. It was a large puzzle whose artwork was created by Christina Riese Lassen of Maui, Hawaii c2004. My daughter’s friend built it, sealed it and presented it to her when she was still in high school. She left it behind when she moved out. It was missing a few pieces in the lower right-hand corner, but I couldn’t part with it. Something about it really spoke to me. And so, it floated around the floor, sometimes being used as a backdrop for photos, but mostly, it was in the way.

The other day, I accidentally loosed a four inch section when I tripped over it. Voila! The idea was born to break it into mail-able pieces I would re-seal them on both sides to make them sturdy enough to survive the postal journey on which they were about to embark.

DSC_0381

But… how to make them my own? I didn’t want to destroy the artist’s work. That was what I loved and why it stayed so long on the studio floor.

While sorting and organizing the magazines I use for collage, words and phrases kept jumping out at me. I decided to take the time to clip some and found that the choices I made had me thinking about the puzzle. In an effort to move past it, I began matching the clippings to the sections I’d broken up, thinking that I simply needed to acknowledge my mind’s connection so that I could move on.

Instead of the release I sought, I found deeper meaning in the bits. I jotted down each word snippet on scratch paper and wrote the first two or three things that came to mind for each one.

When I finished, I had an outline of sorts. Reading over it, I found it was a lesson in self. It reminded me of some things I’d forgotten, showed me where I’d been meaning to go and delivered the promise for which I’d been looking.

Here are the twenty one pieces before mailing:

PuzzleAllTogetherNow PuzzleBalanceBlues PuzzleBeautyElectric PuzzleBloom PuzzleCarvingAnUnusualPath PuzzleCreativeControl PuzzleEnergy PuzzleFuturePerfect PuzzleHeadingIntoTheFuture PuzzleHiddenBeauty PuzzleInspiration PuzzleJewelBox PuzzleRareBirds PuzzleSeaShades PuzzleStrangerInParadise PuzzleSundance PuzzleTheGrassIsAlwaysGreener PuzzleTranquility PuzzleTrueColors PuzzleWhatLiesBeneath

PuzzleMystery

And this is what they inspired:

PieceofthePuzzleJournalArt

They were mailed domestically. Look for them to land soon, in a mailbox near you!

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

P.S. I have recently contributed a piece to the blog You-R-Here. I would really like all my readers to see it because I mention each and every one of you. Please take the time to check it out: http://you-r-here.net/2016/02/01/goodwill-lynn-radford/

 

ICAD 2014 Week 2!

Weekend get-aways really have a way of thwarting one’s efforts to stick to the challenge. The second week found me already lagging behind. I took any opportunity I could to catch-up, even going so far as to delay my Monday post ’til Tuesday.

A Cigar Band Sampler

A Cigar Band Sampler

Day 9 was a cigar band collage. I worried, needlessly, that I may not have collected enough to cover my 4×6 card. I really liked the way it turned out.

Big Pharma

Big Pharma

‘Big Pharma’ was a collage of prescription label bits and some medical security envelope print. Not my best work, but the point was to poke fun of the prescription drug industry.

Green Stamps Benjamin Franklin

Green Stamps Benjamin Franklin

The ‘Green Stamps Benjamin Franklin’ card was strictly for fun. I combined coordinated bits of this and that to give it a vintage feel and yet keep to the S&H Green Stamp colors.

Liars' Club

Liars’ Club

‘Liars’ Club’ began with an old newspaper clipping and grew to include tape, a stamped image and vintage advertisements layered on a 4×6 index divider.

Scrap Work

Scrap Work

‘Scrap Work’ was a fun way to use up bits of paper I’d found scattered on my table top.

Security Flowers

Security Flowers

Experimenting with security envelope print as an art supply gave life to ‘Security Flowers.’

It's Black & White

It’s Black & White

The work with security envelope print continued in ‘It’s Black & White.’

That brings me through Day 15. I’m still down by two days and hope to be fully caught up by next Monday’s ICAD post. Wish me luck! I’m gonna need it!

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

Simplicity

Never before have I blogged a piece of mail art I received with the piece being returned to the sender. Not sure why. I guess it’s just been easier for me to go with incoming and outgoing.

Today, is the exception.

A simple white postcard arrived in my mailbox. One side was neatly addressed. The other side was typed using carbon paper. The purplish blue type, so unique in today’s correspondence told me this was no ordinary mail.

BhomasTrownI

My husband always gets the mail. He delights in producing mail art from the stack of bills and junk because my reaction is always giddy and over-the-top. Imagine my surprise when I stumbled across this in a stack of junk mail I was sorting!

At first, I thought maybe it was a happy accident. I did not recognize the name of the sender. Who was Thomas Brown? Where did he find me? It’s not so difficult, I admit, as I belong to so many mail art and letter writing groups. More intriguing even than the sender was the content.

The hubby said, “It must be from someone in the mail art community.” I wasn’t so sure. I sat on the piece over the weekend, just pondering the whole thing.

Then, yesterday morning, I pulled up IUOMA (The International Union of Mail Artists) and searched for Thomas Brown. A photo of a piece came up under the name, but then I noticed a Bhomas Trown in the registry! Surely, this must be him! I took a gander at his profile and the return address was the same!

Mystery solved! I admit to being slightly disappointed at reconciling the details so quickly. I truly expected it to be more challenging. Or did I learn more from reading all those Agatha Christie novels than I previously thought?

Taking a cue from the simplicity of Thomas’ postcard, I created ‘This Is Not White.’ It was inspired by a Clorox bleach campaign from a few years back.

This Is Not White I

When it came to the reverse side, I paid homage to the typewritten piece and the man behind it.

This Is Not White I (Back)

All bits were scraps left behind from other projects.

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

 

Outbound Mail Art: Consumer Consciousness

Last year, I began a series of mail art using the sticky labels and price tags from consumer goods. After each purchase, I carefully remove all manner of sticky backed things from my goods, placing them on plain 4 x 6 inch index cards.

Here are a few of my very first Consumer Consciousness postcards:

Other Consumer Consciousness pieces appeared here: https://trashbubblesandlifeslittlebits.wordpress.com/2013/05/06/outbound-mail-art/

Although it may seem as though the bits are stuck here and there, willy nilly, I assure you that is not the case. Any collage composition requires thought. It asks one to consider color, shape and relationship among other things. In my case, the message of each piece is always high priority and is reflected in its title. Decorative tape leftovers add interest and cohesiveness, at times helping to secure bits that don’t want to stick. Because the stickers are accumulated over time, it can take several months to complete one postcard.

Below are a few of my most recent Consumer Consciousness pieces, ready for the post.

The series is intended to bring about an awareness of one’s purchases, the consumption of which creates copious amounts of trash. It asks the observer to carefully consider their own Consumer Consciousness.

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

On My Desk: Trash Bubblet Post Card

Last week found me creating mail art as a way to wind down from an overload of projects with deadlines and themes.

Completing a few of my Consumer Consciousness postcards was at the top of my list. After that, I got to work on a new bubblet.

Dentyne blister packs are the most common bubblets in my studio. That might be because Arctic Chill is my gum of choice. 🙂

This time, instead of stitching the bubblet onto a sketchbook page, (https://trashbubblesandlifeslittlebits.wordpress.com/2013/01/15/where-theres-a-will/) I have housed it between two pieces of 4×6 cardstock.

Bubblet in Black and White

The framework is a piece of black cardstock sponged over with white acrylic paint. A window has been cut out of the center to house the bubblet. The backing was plain white (allowing the bubblet’s contents to pop) and was adhered to the framed bubblet with doublesided tape. The piece was then sealed and embellished with black and white printed tapes.

This week, I’ll be busy addressing the finished pieces and mailing them out to some of those patient folks to whom I owe mail.

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

In the Mail: Bubbles By Post!

Bubbles by Mail

Trash Bubbles were not something I ever thought I’d find in my mailbox, when I began creating them. But find them, I did!

Several weeks ago, Corrine Gilman of http://www.sparkledaysstudio.com/ sent me my very first. (You can read that blog post here: https://trashbubblesandlifeslittlebits.wordpress.com/2013/03/08/trash-bubblet-has-landed/)

Bubbles by Mail II

Following quickly on the heels of the Bubblet, Corrine sent a second trash bubble. It was a singular, sizeable bubble, packed with the detritus of life.

Trashy Art Corrine Gilman

One of the things I love about this piece is the rolled up jetBlue luggage tag in the upper left hand corner. Final Destination: BOS. It gives me goosebumps every time I see it.

Mim Golub Scalin of http://mim4art.blogspot.com/ made a great Spinner Bubble from a hearing aid battery blister pack.Mim Golub Scalin

That it’s interactive makes this 4×6 postcard an awesome piece!

Mim Golub Scalin II

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!