Dada: The Celebration Continues 2-19

Last week we touched on what Dada is and I invited you to create your own Dadaist poetry and exchange it with me.

This week, I’d like to expand a little on Dada, sharing a bit about two key women in the Dadaist movement.

Before I do, I’d like to share a piece of Dada mail I received this week. Jude Weirmeir is a very active mail artist whose prolific work is a delight to behold. It is quirky, whimsical, musical and highly entertaining. The things I’ve received from San Diego, California in his name are some of the most treasured pieces in my archives. This one is no exception. It is a celebration of 100 years of Dada.

Jude Weirmeir Dada 100 Years (front)

Jude Weirmeir Dada 100 Years (front)

Jude Weirmeir Dada 100 Years (back)

Jude Weirmeir Dada 100 Years (back)

It must be said that I swooned over the Dada stamps on the back side of this envie. And they gave me the idea for this post.

One of Jude’s rubber stamps depicts “Emmy Hennings, 1st Dada Donor.” Emmy was the wife of Hugo Ball. She gave herself over to a life of Dada from the moment they met in 1913. She had been a published poet and performer with left-wing leanings, so this transition was a natural progression. She and Hugo were founding members of the Cabaret Voltaire in Zurich, Switzerland and she was known as the “shining star of the Voltaire.” I strongly encourage you to learn more about Emmy and her poetry and performance art, though I will say that not much of her work can be found independently of Hugo Ball. They were inseparable and their work was codependent.

Another of Jude’s rubber stamps shows the silhouette of Hannah Höch. She was the most prominent female member and contributor to the Dada movement in Berlin, Germany. Her humble beginnings in fashion and textile were short-lived and she is more widely known for her social, feminist commentary via photo montage and collage. She felt strongly her position of being on the outside, looking in, the only woman in a largely male group of Dadaists who exuded their gender superiority. The chauvinist group included Raoul Hausmann, Georg Schrimpf, Johannes Baader and Hans Richter. In response, a good deal of her work addressed this. Her collage style was more harmonious and cohesive than her male counterparts, another reason they discounted her work. Her art was offensive to the Nazi regime and was included under the “degenerative art” label. She led a very quiet and secluded existence during World War II and her art thereafter did not achieve the acclaim it had before the war. In January thru March of 2014, a comprehensive collection of her work was exhibited at The Whitechapel Gallery, London. I would have loved to have been present at that exhibit! It must be said that I consider Hannah to be the Mother of Modern Collage. One needs only to view images of her work to see how she paved the way for much of what we, as modern day collage artists, do. Once again, I urge you to learn more about Hannah and her work. There are lots of excellent links to be found online, as well as images of her work. Start with the link below. You’ll be glad you did.

http://www.moma.org/explore/multimedia/audios/29/704

If you’re at all like me, you’ll have developed an insatiable curiosity for the people and concepts that we have barely touched upon. Go forth, feed that curiosity and expand your knowledge of Dada and its central characters. Celebrate the accomplishments of those who have come before.

In the tradition of Hannah Höch, I challenge you to create a Dadaist collage with a central theme of great social or economic import to you. Look to the headlines of the day, if you need inspiration. You can share it via social media using the hashtags (#)Dadawatch and (#)MyDada. If you send it to me at The Studio at Piney Creek Acres as mail art, I will send one to you in kind.

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

 

 

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A Bubble of Distinction: American Dream

It has been many months since the creation of my last Trash Bubble. Getting back to it has been difficult, as I have diversified so much. There are always new mediums to try, new ideas popping up and of course, correspondence to be returned.

This piece was not my usual Trash Bubble. It was created as a unique delivery system for a charm I created for a SwapBot swap. Take a look for yourself.

This is the charm I created for the swap, mounted to a piece of card stock on which I had swiped some left-over paint from another project.

This is the charm I created for the swap, mounted to a piece of card stock on which I had swiped some left-over paint from another project.

 

Trimmed to fit, the card was inserted into an old Velcro  package and secured with tiny staples.

Trimmed to fit, the card was inserted into an old Velcro package and secured with tiny staples.

It was covered in patterned duct tape and washi tape to keep the theme going... American Dream.

It was covered in patterned duct tape and washi tape to keep the theme going… American Dream.

Thanks for stopping by!

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

 

In the Mail: Hallowed Greetings and More!

The last few weeks have been tough for me. Pushing to meet deadlines on several fronts and the loss of our beloved pet, Little Lizzie Big Ears, coupled with time constraints to bump up my stress levels.

In the previous post, I showed you how I was coping, allowing myself to create backgrounds, in order to unwind.

Sitting down to open and read my mail art haul is one of my favorite ways to de-stress.

For Halloween, the following gems appeared in the mail box…

Priory Limericks I

From Thom Courcelle

Priory Limericks (back)

Priory Limericks (back)

I hadn’t heard from Thom in some time, as he had recently relocated from the West Coast to the East. Truth be told, I was quite surprised, albeit delighted to hear from him. Can you make out what the stamp above says? 😀

Halloween Swap 2014 from Terry Owenby

From Terry Owenby

A sense of belonging and acceptance is what I treasure most from my participation in the online group, The Studio. The mail is pretty sweet too! Terry Owenby sent this ghostly piece my way in fulfillment of the Halloween Swap we joined.

Edgar Allen Pooh by KDJ

Edgar Allen Pooh by KDJ

KDJ isn’t heard from often these days… too many other real-world responsibilities just now. So you can imagine my surprise at receiving this awesome piece! For someone who loves Edgar Allan Poe and Pooh, I was thrilled by it!

This THRILLING piece hails from Amy Irwen

From Amy Irwen

Speaking of being thrilled, This THRILLING piece hails from Amy Irwen. Her collages are always fun and often stitched. This one did not disappoint!

JillLeafPrint

From Jill Eudaly

Don’t you just love the wood block print from Jill Eudaly, Recycled Daze? The Oak leaves have an awesome texture that this scan didn’t quite capture… The stitching really helped to set it off. You can read more about her adventure in woodblock printing here: http://www.jeudaly.blogspot.com/2014/10/mail-art-out-going-mail-today.html#links

The following mail also arrived…

From Diane Keys

From Diane Keys

Diane Keys must’ve been in a fall mood, or else the squirrels were in her head again… Rusty orange colored label trashpo, a DKULT treasure, to be sure!

From David Stafford

From David Stafford

David Stafford finally got his very own circle punch! Can you tell? The simplicity of this piece stopped me dead in my tracks. It brought to mind a ghostly vision of a white bowling ball….

From Cinzia Farina, ITALY

From Cinzia Farina, ITALY

My first correspondence from Cinzia Farina of ITALY is quite the gem! Yes, that IS real thread weaving through the fingers of the collaged hand! Simply Stunning!

From Jill Adamy

From Jill Adamy

And last, but certainly not least, I present an offering from Jill Adamy of http://www.glimmerbug.com/. She also belongs to the online group, The Studio. When she learned that I was mourning the loss of our Pembroke Welsh Corgi, Little Lizzie Big Ears, she reached out to cheer me with a piece of her art. It measures approximately 81/2″ x 11″ and this scan does not do it justice. The colors are much brighter and the glass beads, added with gel medium, do not show up at all. Trust me, it is way more awesome in person!

Thank you, to all whose mail art helped to lighten some really dark days. It meant more than you could ever know.

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!

P.S. In my haste to publish this post, I realized that I neglected to include a very special mail art package. The images were on my camera card which was not in my possession at the time of this post. My sincerest apologies to Julia Jaques, whose package I savored, opening in stages, so as to derive full enjoyment from it. Check it out…

Julia 2014 Halloween I

The envelope was fun, but the contents, were over the top!

Julia 2014 Halloween II

The packet design was way cool!

Julia 2014 Halloween III

Inside the packet was an ATC and what else? Treats!

Thanks ever so much, Julia! It was like Christmas at Halloween! You truly outdid yourself!

 

Simplicity

Never before have I blogged a piece of mail art I received with the piece being returned to the sender. Not sure why. I guess it’s just been easier for me to go with incoming and outgoing.

Today, is the exception.

A simple white postcard arrived in my mailbox. One side was neatly addressed. The other side was typed using carbon paper. The purplish blue type, so unique in today’s correspondence told me this was no ordinary mail.

BhomasTrownI

My husband always gets the mail. He delights in producing mail art from the stack of bills and junk because my reaction is always giddy and over-the-top. Imagine my surprise when I stumbled across this in a stack of junk mail I was sorting!

At first, I thought maybe it was a happy accident. I did not recognize the name of the sender. Who was Thomas Brown? Where did he find me? It’s not so difficult, I admit, as I belong to so many mail art and letter writing groups. More intriguing even than the sender was the content.

The hubby said, “It must be from someone in the mail art community.” I wasn’t so sure. I sat on the piece over the weekend, just pondering the whole thing.

Then, yesterday morning, I pulled up IUOMA (The International Union of Mail Artists) and searched for Thomas Brown. A photo of a piece came up under the name, but then I noticed a Bhomas Trown in the registry! Surely, this must be him! I took a gander at his profile and the return address was the same!

Mystery solved! I admit to being slightly disappointed at reconciling the details so quickly. I truly expected it to be more challenging. Or did I learn more from reading all those Agatha Christie novels than I previously thought?

Taking a cue from the simplicity of Thomas’ postcard, I created ‘This Is Not White.’ It was inspired by a Clorox bleach campaign from a few years back.

This Is Not White I

When it came to the reverse side, I paid homage to the typewritten piece and the man behind it.

This Is Not White I (Back)

All bits were scraps left behind from other projects.

Happy Trash to you, until we meet again!